August 29th, 2014

design-is-fine:

Yusaku Kamekura, Logos, Signets & Trademarks, 1963-66. Japan > aquavelvet.

(via andren)

vintagemanga:

Beautiful 70’s Garo / ガロ covers by HAYASHI Seiichi (林静一 ).

(via andren)

Marvin Gaye - Anna’s song

(Source: youtube.com)

"너로된 이불, Blanket of you" 2009

(Source: killheji, via sage-arts)

August 28th, 2014

Listen/purchase: Isolation by Es-K

August 27th, 2014
Still celebrate ya my dude #happynationaldogday #dribbble #behance

Still celebrate ya my dude #happynationaldogday #dribbble #behance

August 25th, 2014
artcomesfirst:

Shadows

artcomesfirst:

Shadows

iron-and-wind:

67-impalas:

Xx

Vivid Patriotism.

iron-and-wind:

67-impalas:

Xx

Vivid Patriotism.

(Source: texas-redneck, via thehivernant)

medievalpoc:

Cornelis Poppe

Allegory of Africa and America

Germany (early 1600s)

Mother of Pearl and Gilt Bronze: Nautilus. Mother of pearl shell with incised decoration, carried by a black man wearing a tobacco leaf skirt and standing on the shell of a tortoise, depicting the allegory of Africa (on a crocodile) and of America (riding on an armadillo).

Genéve, Musée d’Art et d’Histoire.

The Image of the Black in Western Art Research Project and Photo Archive, W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research, Harvard University

lusidar:

Amidst Times Square’s maelstrom of advertising and commercial culture, Alfredo Jaar‘s animation A Logo for America displays the statement “This is not America” emblazoned across the outline of the United States. Through an apparently contradictory juxtaposition, the work denounces the fact that the word “America” is routinely but erroneously applied to just one part of the American continent. In the 2014 reiteration of this 1987 intervention, Jaar points out that, almost 30 years later, the representation of an entire continent is still monopolized by the same, single country.

lusidar:

Amidst Times Square’s maelstrom of advertising and commercial culture, Alfredo Jaar‘s animation A Logo for America displays the statement “This is not America” emblazoned across the outline of the United States. Through an apparently contradictory juxtaposition, the work denounces the fact that the word “America” is routinely but erroneously applied to just one part of the American continent. In the 2014 reiteration of this 1987 intervention, Jaar points out that, almost 30 years later, the representation of an entire continent is still monopolized by the same, single country.

(Source: lusidar, via masochistcat)

There is something about poverty that smells like death. Dead dreams dropping off the heart like leaves in a dry season and rotting around the feet; impulses smothered too long in the fetid air of underground caves. The soul lives in a sickly air. People can be slave-ships in shoes.
Zora Neale Hurston, Dust Tracks on a Road: An Autobiography (New York:  HarperCollins, 1996), 87. (Originally published 1942)

(Source: vigilanteespresso, via goldensense)

August 23rd, 2014

erikkwakkel:

Losing yourself in a labyrinth

Here is something special I happened upon by coincidence in a French database today. These unique drawings are found in a handwritten book from 1611 produced by Nicolas de Rély, a monk from Corbie. We know little about the author and the book is relatively unknown in scholarship, which is kind of amazing considering its topic: a study of medieval labyrinths. These large objects were mazes of up to 40 feet in diameter, built into the floor of cathedrals of twelfth and thirteenth-century Europe (see Chartres Cathedral, lower image). Church visitors, which included a lot of pilgrims, had to undertake a journey to its centre - the latter on their knees, by means of repentance. The labyrinth is also an intellectual exercise, of creating an object of perfect harmony, of balance and calculation, like the Gothic cathedrals which housed them. The monk in the early 17th century was so fascinated by them that he devoted a study to their shapes and routes, replicating them in detail: what a beautiful way to lose yourself!

Pic: Amiens, Bibliothèque municipale, MS 405 (dated 1611). More images and some more information here. More information of labyrinths here and in this PDF. More about the Amiens labyrinth here.

(via sineceraa)